A recent meta-analysis of 49 prior studies with 1863 participants was published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The conclusions were not surprising.

I’ve always used the rule of 1 gram of protein per pound of Lean Body Mass. So for a guy – like me – weighing 180 pounds with 20% body fat, you would top out at 140+/- grams of protein per day.

Their conclusion: 1.6 grams of protein per kg of body weight. 180 pounds = 81.6 kg x 1.6 grams = 130 grams. Not a significant difference in calculation. Another way of looking at it – .70 grams of protein times your body weight.

Summary/conclusion Dietary protein supplementation significantly enhanced changes in muscle strength and size during prolonged RET [Resistance Exercise Training] in healthy adults. Increasing age reduces and training experience increases the efficacy of protein supplementation during RET. With protein supplementation, protein intakes at amounts greater than ~1.6 g/kg/day do not further contribute RET-induced gains in FFM [Fat-Free Mass].

Let this be your guide to how much protein you need to maximize your gains from exercise.

One more concept – don’t forget Gluconeogenesis: a metabolic pathway that results in the generation of glucose from certain non-carbohydrate carbon substrates, such as protein. Too much protein generates glucose and undermines Ketosis.

One more post script: This only applies if you are actually doing Resistance Training.